German cardinal revokes license of theologian

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Cardinal Joachim Meisner of Cologne, Germany has revoked theologian David Berger’s license to teach theology.

The Archdiocese of Cologne said on May 5 that Cardinal Meisner decided to revoke Berger’s “mission canonica,” that is, his license to teach religion classes in schools.

The cardinal “was forced to take this step because Dr. Berger, through his publications and statements to the media, has established that he does not agree with the teaching and the moral and juridical norms of the Church.”

As a result, the archdiocese continued, Berger “has destroyed the trust that is essential for the mission of evangelization, and therefore the archbishop believes he is no longer qualified to carry out religious instruction in the Catholic Church. 

“For this reason, the revoking of his license to teach the doctrine of the Church is unavoidable.”

The French daily “La Croix” noted that in 2010, Berger was removed from the Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas because of an article he published in the German newspaper Frankfruter Rundschau, in which he “deplored a ‘limited’ approach of the Church toward homosexuals.”

Berger also wrote a book titled, “Der heilige Schein (The Holy Apparition),” “in which he openly criticizes the teachings of the Church.”

The Church’s teaching on homosexuality

The Catholic teaching on homosexuality is summarized in paragraphs 2357-2359 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which state that homosexuals “must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided.”

Homosexuality, as a tendency, “is objectively disordered,” and “constitutes for most of them (homosexuals) a trial.”

“Basing itself on Sacred Scripture, which presents homosexual acts as acts of grave depravity, tradition has always declared that homosexual acts are intrinsically disordered … They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved,” the Catechism teaches.

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